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Environmental Health Sciences Graduate Program
(formerly Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program)

UC Irvine's Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine provides training in Environmental Health Sciences, culminating with the award of the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in one of two tracks, 1) Environmental Toxicology and 2) Exposure Sciences and Risk Assessment, or the Master of Science (M.S.) degree. The Environmental Health Sciences program grew out of the Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, which has trained Ph.D. and M.S. students and postdoctoral scholars for more than 35 years at UC Irvine. The Environmental Health Sciences program provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary and appropriate to teach and/or conduct basic and applied research programs in inhalation/pulmonary toxicology, biochemical neurotoxicology, reproductive and developmental toxicology, exposure modeling, exposure assessment, chemical pathology, toxicokinetics, radiation toxicology, molecular carcinogenesis, and risk assessment.

Environmental Toxicology involves the scientific study of the entry, distribution, biotransformation and mechanism of the action of chemical agents that are harmful to the body. The graduate program interprets environmental toxicology as the study of the effects and mechanisms of action of hazardous chemicals in food, air, water and soil in the home, the workplace and the community. It considers experimentally and theoretically such diverse research problems as:

  • New scientific approaches to toxicological evaluation of environmental chemicals such as air and water pollutants, food additives, industrial wastes and agricultural adjuvants at the molecular, cellular and organism levels;
  • Mechanisms of action in chemical toxicity;
  • The molecular pathology of tissue injury in acute and chronic toxicity.

Exposure Sciences involves the study of human exposures to environmental contaminants in different media such as air, water, and food and via multiple routes including inhalation, ingestion, and dermal absorption. Risk Assessment combines knowledge obtained from toxicological and exposure studies to come to conclusions about the risks to human health.  Research in the Exposure Sciences and Risk Assessment Track includes:

  • New approaches to the evaluation of human exposures to environmental chemicals, including exposure modeling and biomonitoring.
  • Scientific principles involved in evaluating risks to human health from environmental exposures.

The Environmental Health Sciences Graduate Program is based in the Department of Medicine in the School of Medicine. It is also an official graduate program of the Program in Public Health.

The EHS program is proud to announce UCI Graduate Professional Success in the Biomedical Sciences (GPS-BIOMED), a new NIH-funded program for professional development of graduate students in the biomedical sciences. UCI is the only research institution in Southern California with such a program.

The application deadline is Jan. 15, 2017. However, applicants wishing to be considered for all funding possibilities must submit their applications by December 15, 2016.

For more information, please click on the drop-down drawers directly below:

How to Apply »

Application Requirements

The following items are required to apply:

  • Online UC Irvine application and fee and SOPHAS application and fee
  • Statement of Purpose (Submitted in both applications)
  • Personal History Statement (Submitted in both applications if applicable)
  • GRE General Test scores (Submitted to SOPHAS and UCI Graduate Division)
  • Official transcripts from all institutions including community college and graduate coursework
  • 3 Letters of Recommendation (Submitted online to SOPHAS only)

SOPHAS and UC Irvine Application:

  • We do require both applications to be complete and paid in full in order for your application to be considered for review.
  • There is a fee for both applications (SOPHAS- $120 for the initial application; UC Irvine- $90 domestic and $110 international)
  • The UC Irvine Application window opens in mid-September. The SOPHAS application window opens September 3rd.

There are two sets of requirements for admission into graduate programs in the University of California: university requirements and program requirements.

General university requirements for admission to graduate study are available in the online UC Irvine General Catalog in the section titled "Graduate Division" and also in the Graduate Division bulletin, "UC Irvine Graduate Application for Admission."

The UC Irvine Institution Code for submitting your GRE scores to the Environmental Health Sciences Program is 4859. The Institution Code for submitting your TOEFL scores is 4859.

The entrance requirements for graduate students in Environmental Health Sciences are listed below. In cases where students with deficiencies in certain areas are admitted into the graduate program, those deficiencies will be made up during the first year of residence in the program. The student will be notified of any apparent deficiency at the time of acceptance into the graduate program.

Please note: the PhD program application requires that you complete both the UCI (DAVAD) and SOPHAS application. If you are applying for the MS degree, only the DAVAD application needs to be completed.

 

Entrance Requirements for Students Majoring in Environmental Health Sciences 

Subject      

Suggested UC Irvine equivalent

Calculus

Math 2A-B-D Calculus
(3D Elementary Differential Equations is recommended but not required)

Physics

Physics 3A-B-C Basic Physics

General Chemistry    

Chem 1 A-B-C General Chemistry

Organic Chemistry

Chem 51 A-B-C; laboratory recommended

Biochemistry

BioSci 98 Biochemistry; laboratory recommended

General Biology

BioSci 94 Diversity of Life
BioSci 96 Ecology

Physical Chemistry
(strongly recommended, but not required)  

Any two of the following three courses:
Chem 130A Chemical Thermodynamics
Chem 130B Quantum Chem., Spectroscopy, Bonding
Chem 130C Chem. Dynamics and MacroMolecules
or
Any two of the following three courses:
Chem 131A Quantum Principles
Chem 131B Mol. Struct. & Elem. Statistical Mechanics
Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics

Faculty Research »

Ulrike Luderer, MD, PhD, MPH
— Director, Environmental Health Sciences Graduate Program

Luderer's research on reproductive and developmental toxicology is currently focused on understanding the role(s) of oxidative stress and antioxidants in ovarian toxicity, ovarian aging and ovarian cancer. A second area of focus is developmental toxicology of the reproductive system, specifically the developmental basis of premature ovarian failure and ovarian cancer.

Dean B. Baker, MD — Director, Center for Occupational and Environmental Health

Baker's epidemiologic research is focused on environmental studies of hazardous waste sites, childhood exposure to environmental pollutants, asthma among inner-city children, the role of irritant exposure in occupational asthma, occupational stress, indoor air pollution and the use of biological markers of exposure for subclinical effects.  


Scott M. Bartell, PhD

Bartell's research in exposure sciences and risk assessment focuses on probabilistic models and statistical methods for exposure assessment, environmental epidemiology and risk decision analysis.

Bruce Blumberg, PhD

Dr. Blumberg's research focuses on the role of nuclear hormone receptors in development, physiology and disease and how these may be disrupted by hormonally active compounds in the diet and environment. Particular research interests are the effects of environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (obesogens) on the development of obesity and on the role of highly chlorinated chemicals such as PCBs and PBDEs on the development of the immune system and on lymphoma.

Stephen C. Bondy, PhD

Bondy's research in molecular neurotoxicology focuses on the potential role of toxic agents in the promotion of brain aging and neurological disease. Studies include evaluation of agents that accelerate or retard the aging process. Endpoints range from behavioral tests to assay of gene expression. In addition, the properties of aluminum that relate to neurotoxicity and its possible contribution to Alzheimer's disease are being investigated.

Vincent J. Caiozzo, PhD

Caiozzo's expertise is in structure and function of muscle with an emphasis on exercise physiology. He has a special interest in the role of environmental toxicants in modulating physiological responses in human muscle.

Jefferson Y. Chan, MD, PhD

Chan's research in chemical pathology focuses on the oxidative stress response in cells exposed to toxic xenobiotics.

Ralph J. Delfino, MD, PhD

Delfino's research is focused on air pollution exposure assessment and health effects, chronic disease and environmental epidemiology, and gene-environment interactions.

Derek Dunn-Rankin, PhD

Dunn-Rankin's major research focus is on laser and optical diagnostics in practical systems, optical particle sizing, droplet formation and vaporization and their application to human exposures.

Rufus D. Edwards, PhD

Edwards' research in exposure sciences and risk assessment focuses on air pollution, particles, volatile organic compounds, greenhouse gases and environmental epidemiology in the developing world and European cities.

Chenyang (Sunny) Jiang, PhD

Jiang's research focus is in coastal water quality microbiology and the application of molecular techniques to detect human pathogenic bacteria and viruses in aquatic environments.

Virginia Kimonis, MD

Kimonis is a Clinical Geneticist-Scientist with a strong interest in the genetics of neuromuscular diseases. Her laboratory focuses on the genetic causes of muscle disease. She is particularly interested in inherited muscle disorders that occur in combination with diseases of bone.

Michael T. Kleinman, PhD — Co-director, Air Pollution Health Effects Laboratory

Kleinman's research focuses on the mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury following inhalation of toxic compounds. His laboratory uses state-of-the-art methods to evaluate the roles of free radicals and oxidative stress in sensitive human volunteers and laboratory animals. In vitro methods are used to evaluate specific mechanisms. Other interests include analytical and atmospheric chemistry, environmental sampling and analysis, and the application of mathematical and statistical methods to environmental and occupational assessments of exposure and risk.

Charles E. Lambert, PhD

Lambert's research is in industrial and regulatory toxicology, pharmaceutical toxicology as it relates to impurities and degradants, green chemistry and life cycle evaluations, risk assessment and risk communication.

Charles L. Limoli, PhD

Limoli studies the mechanisms by which cells perpetuate genomic instability in response to radiation and environmental toxicants and the role of oxidative stress in these processes. He also explores how DNA damage and oxidative stress may drive the progression of normal multipotent cells in the central nervous system to brain tumor stem cell.

Oladele A. Ogunseitan, PhD — Chair, Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention

Ogunseitan's research is focused on microbial diversity and ecology, environmental pollution, industrial ecology, health and development.

Kathryn E. Osann, PhD

Osann's specialty is in cancer epidemiology and applied biostastics.

Robert F. Phalen, PhD — Co-director, Air Pollution Health Effects Laboratory

Phalen's research focus is on the aerodynamics of particle deposition in the developing lung and in the adult lung. Another area of interest is in the assessment of lung defense mechanisms using radio-labeled aerosol inhalation challenges. His lab uses quantitative morphometry to study the mechanism of interference with organogenesis and possible long-term consequences for chronic lung disease due to toxic inhalation exposure. Additional studies include evaluating the tolerance of animals to air pollution mixtures as a mechanism that may protect humans against ambient pollutants.

John Leslie Redpath, PhD — Professor Emeritus


Ronald C. Shank, PhD 
— Professor Emeritus


Veronica Vieira, DSc

Vieira has an extensive knowledge of GIS, groundwater modeling, cluster detection methods, and on persistent environmental contaminants including tetrachloroethylene (PCE, a dry-cleaning solvent), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, a perfluorinated compound (PFC) involved in the manufacturing of Teflon), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, a common class of flame retardants). Components of her work include improving methods for geocoding rural addresses using GIS and examining the relationship between PFOA exposures and health outcomes.  Vieira's research also includes method development for spatial epidemiology such as disease mapping, cluster detection, and space-time interactions.

Jun Wu, PhD

Wu's research focus is on air pollution exposure assessment and air pollution epidemiology.

Course Descriptions »

Graduate Courses in Environmental Health Sciences

201 — Principles of Toxicology (4) Spring. Problem solving to demonstrate principles of toxicology; quantitative dose-response relationship; toxicant-target (receptor) interaction emphasizing interspecies differences in Ah receptor and dioxins; complete in vivo metabolism of xenobiotics by mammalian systems: integration of organ responses to toxic agents. Prerequisite: TOX 206A-B, or consent of instructor. (Staff)

202 — Environmental Toxicology (4) Fall. Analysis of real problems involving toxic chemicals and the human food, air and water supplies, occupational exposures, and life styles. Formal problems will be considered by small groups of students and discussed by the class. (Staff)

204 —Neurotoxicology (4) Winter. The effects of various harmful chemicals upon nervous system function. Emphasis given to the molecular events underlying neurological damage and to the relation of such processes to basic mechanisms of neurobiology. (Bondy)

206A,B — Target Organ Toxicology (6,6) Fall, Winter. Analysis of the responses occurring in individual organs of man and animals exposed to environmental chemicals at toxic levels; distinctive structural and functional features of ten organ systems are presented in terms of phenomena, mechanisms of action, and methods of study. Same as Public Health 277. (Staff)

207 — Experimental Design and Interpretation of Toxicology Studies (2) F or W. Introduction to methods of structuring toxicology experiments and analyzing data including experimental design, data distributions, sample sizes, hypothesis testing, linear regression, analysis of variance, multiple comparison testing and non-parametric tests. (Kleinman)

212 — Inhalation Toxicology (4) Spring, odd years. The principles and practice of laboratory inhalation toxicology. Topics include aerosols, gases, respiratory tract structure and function, lung defenses, aerosol deposition exposure techniques, characterization of exposure atmospheres, experimental designs, animal models, research ethics, and regulations and guidelines. (Phalen)

220 — Industrial Toxicology (4) S. Analysis of responsibilities toxicologists have in industry, including product safety generating material safety, data sheets, animal testing, ecotoxicological testing, risk/hazard communication, and assisting industrial hygienists and occupational physicians; emphasis on interdisciplinary nature of industrial toxicology and communication skills. Prerequisite: TOX 206A-B or consent of instructor. Same as Public Health 278. (Lambert)

264 — Environmental Health Sciences I: Introduction to Environmental Health Science (4). Convergence of agents (chemical, physical, biological, or psychosocial) in the environment can emerge as diseases influenced by social, political, and economic factors, allowing them to become rooted in society. How these agents from various spheres come together and impact human health. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Public Health 264/ Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E224/Epidemiology 264. (Wu)

269 Air Pollution, Climate, and Health (4). Emission of air pollutants into the atmosphere, physical and meteorological processes that affect transport, and influence on global warming. Concepts of how and where people are most exposed, and how exposures and health effects differ in developed and developing regions. Same as Epidemiology 270/Public Health 269 and Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E247. (Edwards)

270 — Human Exposure to Environmental Contaminants (4). Introduces founders of conceptual thought that environmental contaminants can impact health. Theory and principles of exposure assessment, the continuum from emissions of a contaminant into the environment to evidence of health effects in a population. Same as Epidemiology 270/Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E248/Public Health 270. (Edwards)

275 — Exposure Modeling and Risk Assessment (4). This course surveys the general principles, basic mathematical methods, and practices of environmental modeling and human health risk assessment. Topics include advection-dispersion models for contaminants in air and water, uptake by plants and animals, dose-response modeling, risk management, and risk perception. Although the emphasis is on environmental toxicants, infectious disease transmission models are are briefly introduced. Students conduct an original risk assessment as a final group project. Same as Public Health 275 (Bartell).

290 — Independent Study in Environmental Toxicology (2-12) Fall, Winter, Spring. With consent from a faculty member who will supervise the program, a student may receive credit for individual study in some area of toxicology, culminating in the completion of a scholarly paper on the subject. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)

297 — Advanced Topics in Occupational Toxicology (2) F,W,S. Discussions with clinical and research faculty in environmental toxicology and occupational medical on current toxicology problems in the workplace and critical review of current publications in the field. Journal club/seminar format. (Luderer).

298A,B,C — Environmental Toxicology Seminar (2) Fall, Winter, Spring. Presentation and discussion of current research problems and issues by students, postdoctoral fellows, faculty, and guests, covering the broad research and policy areas of environmental toxicology. (Luderer)

299 A,B,C — Research Problems (1 to 12) Fall, Winter, Spring. Research work for the M.S. thesis or Ph.D. dissertation. (Staff)


Graduate Courses in Statistics

201 — Statistical Methods for Data Analysis I (4). Introduction to statistical methods for analyzing data from experiments and surveys. Methods covered include two-sample procedures, analysis of variance, simple and multiple linear regression. May not be taken for graduate credit by Statistics graduate students. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics (at level of Statistics 7). Concurrent with Statistics 110.

202 — Statistical Methods for Data Analysis II (4). Introduction to statistical methods for analyzing data from surveys or experiments. Emphasizes application and understanding of methods for categorical data including contingency tables, logistic and Poisson regression, loglinear models. May not be taken for graduate credit by Statistics graduate students. Prerequisite: Statistics 201 or equivalent. Concurrent with Statistics 111.

203 — Statistical Methods for Data Analysis III (4). Introduction to statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal data from experiments and cohort studies. Topics covered include survival methods for censored time-to-event data, linear mixed models, non-linear mixed effects models, and generalized estimating equations. May not be taken for graduate credit by Statistics graduate students. Prerequisite: Statistics 202 or equivalent. Concurrent with Statistics 112.
 

Graduate Courses in Epidemiology


200 — Principles of Epidemiology (4). Presents descriptive and experimental approaches to the recognition of the causal association of disease in the general population, as these approaches apply to populations using different student designs and models from the literature. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

204 — Biostatistics (4). Designed to help students develop an appreciation for the statistician's view of the research process, emphasizing biomedical research. Instills an understanding of how statistical models are used to yield insights about the data that form evidence-based understanding of the world around us. Same as Public Health 204.

205 — Environmental Epidemiology (4). Concentrates on epidemiological approaches to the assessment of community environmental hazards; issues involved in environmental exposure estimation; interdisciplinary approaches to environmental epidemiology, including the use of biomarkers of exposures and susceptibility; epidemiological studies within the context of risk assessment. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

269 — Air Pollution, Climate, and Health (4). Emission of air pollutants into the atmosphere, physical and meteorological processes that affect transport, and influence on global warming. Concepts of how and where people are most exposed, and how exposures and health effects differ in developed and developing regions. Same as Public Health 269 and Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E247/Environmental Toxicology 269.

270 — Human Exposure to Environmental Contaminants (4). Introduces founders of conceptual thought that environmental contaminants can impact health. Theory and principles of exposure assessment, the continuum from emissions of a contaminant into the environment to evidence of health effects in a population. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E248/Public Health 270/Environmental Toxicology 270.


Graduate Courses in Public Health

207 — Public Health Statistics (4). Surveys statistical methods for public health. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability models, likelihood functions, estimation, and hypothesis testing for categorical and continuous data. Students learn to use statistical software to perform epidemiologic data analysis. Prerequisites: Public Health 203 or similar introductory epidemiology course and Mathematics 2A or similar introductory calculus course; graduate standing or consent of instructor.

276 — Toxic Chemicals in the Environment (4). Industrial ecology of toxicants and their impacts on environmental quality and human health. Explores theoretical basis of toxicity thresholds and regulatory issues. Uses classic and contemporary research articles to understand the legacy of traditional toxicants, and to identify emerging threats. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Epidemiology 244.

264 — Environmental Health Sciences I: Introduction to Environmental Health Science (4). Convergence of agents (chemical, physical, biological, or psychosocial) in the environment can emerge as diseases influenced by social, political, and economic factors, allowing them to become rooted in society. How these agents from various spheres come together and impact human health. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E224/Epidemiology 264/Environmental Toxicology 264.

265 — Environmental Health Sciences II: Advanced Environmental Health Science (4). Explores the complex relationships among exposure processes and adverse health effects of environmental toxins focusing on specific chemicals, sources, transport media, exposure pathways, and human behaviors. Techniques of environmental sampling for exposure assessment are discussed. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E225/Epidemiology 265.

283 — Geographic Information Systems for Public Health (4). Basic geographic, cartographic, and GIS concepts including computer representation of physical, political, statistical, and social aspects of space using vector and grid-based maps. Experience with extensive geographic base map files and databases (Vieira).


View our Seminar Schedule ›

View more information on the Master's Programs ›


View more information on the Doctoral Programs ›


View the Environmental Health Sciences Student Handbook ›

For questions and additional information on UC Irvine's graduate programs in Environmental Health Sciences, please contact:

Mr. Armando Villalpando
Student Affairs Officer, Graduate Program in Environmental Health Sciences
Afvillal@uci.edu
949-824-8848

For questions about academic aspects of the program, please contact:

Ulrike Luderer, MD, PhD, MPH
Director, Graduate Program in Environmental Health Sciences
uluderer@uci.edu

at

Environmental Health Sciences Graduate Program
Center for Occupational and Environmental Health
Zotcode 1830
100 Theory, Suite 100
Irvine, CA 92617

Telephone: 949-824-8848
Fax: 949-824-2345

You may also apply to the graduate program online at http://www.grad.uci.edu.


For Program Alumni